The reliable source of traffic and leads from your evergreen content will give you the flexibility to experiment with other marketing tactics to generate revenue, such as sponsored content, social media advertising, and distributed content. Plus, your content will not only help attract leads -- it will also help educate your target prospects and generate awareness for your brand.
This one’s incredibly difficult to answer, as every day can be different for web content writers. When I was working as a solo freelancer, for instance, my days looked very different than when I worked for a single employer. Right now, I manage a content team, so my days have changed yet again in order to balance the administrative demands of my company with its content needs.
Add value. That’s the secret. It’s not really a secret at all. We've already talked about it throughout this piece. Although when you look at some of the marketing companies engage in you wonder if they’re purposely avoiding the obvious. We skip advertising when it provides little to no value. If you want to learn about advertising that doesn’t get skipped, find a skateboarder and ask him if you can watch him look through a skateboard magazine. You’ll see that he spends as much time looking at the ads as he does looking at the articles and photos. Or check out The Berrics website. Much of the content is advertisements, but skaters don’t skip these videos, they watch them just like they watch the other videos, because they’re getting the value they want--good skating. As a skater I’d like to say skateboard companies pioneered content marketing decades ago, but I know they were only doing what came naturally, and selling more product was secondary to the fun of creating videos and magazines. If you want to hire someone onto your marketing team who understands content marketing intuitively, hiring a skateboarder might not be a bad step.
In 1933, Procter & Gamble started to broadcast a radio serial drama sponsored by their Oxydol soap powder. The owners wanted to build brand loyalty by aiming to adult women. They could intermix their marketing messages into the serial drama. The term soap opera was born in this year, and they marked a precedent for native ads. Engagement with the audience was a key element with the creation of this content.

Step 3: Brainstorm, then create your content marketing plan. Planning and creating new content isn’t just about mapping and metrics. Brainstorming and asset planning can be one of the most challenging and important parts of content creation. To catch inspiration when it strikes, you need a receptive environment, and team-wide willingness to try new things. An editorial calendar is not only where you keep track of, coordinate, and share your upcoming content, it is a strategic tool that helps your team execute integrated programs that include your content. Keeping an editorial calendar ensures that you’re releasing your content at the best possible moment, and that your whole team is aligned around the release dates. 

Quick turnarounds. When you write for an employer, on their timeline, you will need to be able to write fast and write well. This is especially true for writers just breaking into content writing. Often, your project will come with an expected words per hour, or article per hour, as well as strict deadlines. You will not have time to labor over every word or turn of phrase. Instead, you will need to produce content fast and at a constant rate.[5]

Site viewers tend to move through a Web site in a non-linear, unpredictable manner, making web pages more like newspapers than books. They can enter a site from any page, and move between pages as they choose. As such, it’s best to create content for each page that is not dependent on other sections. Related links can help to guide the reader to background or explanatory information.
Content marketing requires manpower, so the first step is figuring out who is going to head up the program. There's no one-size-fits-all for team structure -- it depends largely on the size of your company, your marketing team, and your budget. But if we assume that those three things are interlinked, as they often are, I can provide you with some frameworks based off of other content marketing-focused companies' structures. These should help you hire the right people, and have them "sitting" in the right spot in your organization.

I've thought long about this. As an agile writer, I'm often tasked with writing in different capacities. Sometimes I'll write product descriptions for my ecommerce businesses. Sometimes I'll write articles to help drive organic search traffic. And other times, I'll write email sequences and sales letters. Stepping back, I had to look at it all and think about the best tips that have helped me write killer and persuasive copy.
I hired Chris Orzechowski to write copy for our latest Kickstarter project. The first 5 emails he wrote for us generated over $100,000 of sales in the first three hours of our launch. After 30 days, we made a grand total of $5,170,445 of sales. And as a result, we added 18,550 new buyers to our house list. Chris’s copy is clear, engaging, and fun to read. And most importantly… it will make you a fortune. If you’re looking for a professional copywriter who can transform your business… then hire Chris immediately before your competition does.
John is a copywriting boss. The ideas and education I've received through John and the McMethod, have directly contributed to a 300% monthly revenue increase in my consulting business in the last 12 months. But the expertise runs much deeper than setting up a basic autoresponder: I've learned sharp ways to research the customer psychology, how to think about the macro-level strategy of segmenting buyers, what kind of tone to use for different mediums/buyer profiles, and how to craft kickass cold emails to drum up new business out of thin air. The cool thing about John is: his curiosity is like a vacuum machine sucking in ideas from his own tested marketing, and those of the world's veteran marketers/copywriters on the podcast...and I just get to sit back, listen, and get the concentrated insights of the world's top business players. As a direct response marketer, I can't recommend highly enough.
Very helpful article. It narrows things down nicely and also helped me to realize that my article could use some trimming up. When I started it I was worried that it wasn’t ‘enough’, now I know that I need to do some more editing. Thank you so much, I got a lot out of it. And I do agree that my notes from this will make a wonderful proofreading tool.
Quick turnarounds. When you write for an employer, on their timeline, you will need to be able to write fast and write well. This is especially true for writers just breaking into content writing. Often, your project will come with an expected words per hour, or article per hour, as well as strict deadlines. You will not have time to labor over every word or turn of phrase. Instead, you will need to produce content fast and at a constant rate.[5]
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