What does your reader fear the most? Is it bed bugs? Maybe it's the IRS? Maybe it's some other calamity like being in debt or having their house foreclosed or dissapearing from Google's search engine? Maybe something else? Figure it out. To do that, you need to implicitly understand your audience. What keeps them up at night and what drives them during the day?
What do you want readers to do with the content you create? If your only answer is, “Well, read it, I guess,” you need to go back to the drawing board. Before you even start writing, you need to know what your call to action will be, and you need to make it compelling enough that readers can’t help but click. That’s how you connect content writing to marketing goals and prove ROI.
Lack of creative license. Though you may think content writing will give you a chance to showcase your creativity and rousing ability with words, in fact, most content writing is seen as a way to sell a product or simply inform a reader of the facts. In a content writer role, you will likely be writing about dry or dull topics, though you may get a chance to also write copy for more engaging projects on occasion. Your employer will dictate the topics you write about, and you will need to learn to be flexible and engaged on even the most obscure or boring subjects, regardless of your personal preference.[4]
With the pace of social media and the frequency of blogging, not to mention that many of your content assets will be used across multiple campaigns and teams, a lightweight project management tool is critical. I recommend using a free software called Trello, which helps you organize your content, set deadlines, attach files, and collaborate with multiple teammates. Another great tool for keeping content projects organized from planning to publishing is Zerys -- a content marketing tool with a built-in marketplace of professional writers. 
Understanding the purpose of content is key to producing high-quality work. It's meant to speak directly with a particular audience, such as customers, potential customers, investors, employees, or other stakeholders. Content can be well-written, researched and creatively conceived, but if it isn't speaking to the intended audience, it's not doing its job.  Here are a few good examples of long-form, quality content written by Scripted writers:
Premium or gated assets are typically longer form, and/or more time-intensive pieces that don't exist on a blog. They might be used to generate leads or contacts, or for brand-building purposes. These are typically created by the dedicated long-form content creator if your team is large enough to have one, but sometimes bloggers get involved too, as blog posts are good testing grounds for what performs well and is thus worth investing in.
When tax season rolls around and people are Googling answers to their tax preparation questions, they stumble upon your blog posts, and realize you offer tax preparation services. Some of them keep doing their own tax preparation, but perhaps keep you in mind for next year; others throw their hands up in the air, decide to rid themselves of tax preparation headaches for good, and hire you -- because you're clearly way more qualified to do this than they are.
As you complete each content writing gig, or as you gain more experience in a permanent position, add each article or piece of writing to an online portfolio. This will then help you network for other writing projects and positions in the future. With enough clips and contacts, you may then be able to freelance and work for yourself as a content writer.[14]
CopyPress pays out writing assignments per word, depending on individual campaigns. As a content writer, you’ll be assigned projects that you can accept or reject. An editor will review your work. Projects are typically blog posts in the 300- to 500-word range. While some reviews on Glassdoor suggest a net-90 payment window and low payment rates, other reviews note high work volume.
Ebooks are the next step in the inbound marketing process: After reading a blog post (such as this one), visitors might want more information. This is where calls-to-action (CTAs) come into play, directing people to a landing page where they can submit their contact information and download an ebook to learn more valuable information for their business. In turn, the business producing the ebook has a new lead for the sales team to contact.
Your specific needs might vary -- for instance, perhaps you need subject matter expertise in your writers, or coding experience from your long-form content creators. Or perhaps your titles differ, and your "content creators" are actually "content strategists", or your "social media manager" is really a "specialist." Make edits as you see fit, but these frameworks should be helpful in getting you started if this is your first time hiring for any of these positions.
Practice article writing. Learn how to write a newspaper article and how to write a wikiHow article. As a professional content writer, you may find a position that focuses on journalistic article style writing, or more educational how to writing. Study the form, structure, voice, and tone of each type of article so you are familiar with both types.
Compare that with Email B from Banana Republic. The goal of this email is to sell shorts, but the copy isn't just shoving shorts down the recipient's throat. I mean, they're shorts ... big deal, right? They've identified what makes these shorts worthwhile: their versatility. They allow a man to lounge around the house and then go out in the city while putting minimal effort into changing his outfit. How convenient! How easy! How versatile!
Blog posts. Distill your content marketing strategy into your blog schedule or strategy. The company blog can and should be used to cross-promote other content, which will help keep posts on a consistent schedule. If you don’t have a marketing team member who is familiar with search engine optimization (SEO), this is one area where you might want to consult a professional. 
Check your local college or university for a technical writing certificate program. Look at the faculty of the program to confirm you are being taught by professionals in the field or working content writers who are familiar with the demands of the writing industry. Certificate programs can be beneficial for writers who are new to content writing or technical writing.[6]
Videos are a highly engaging content medium that are shareable across social media platforms and websites alike. Videos require a bigger investment of time and resources than written content, but as visual marketing increases in popularity -- after all, it's 40X more likely to get shared on social media than other types of content -- it's a medium worth experimenting with.
Step 3: Brainstorm, then create your content marketing plan. Planning and creating new content isn’t just about mapping and metrics. Brainstorming and asset planning can be one of the most challenging and important parts of content creation. To catch inspiration when it strikes, you need a receptive environment, and team-wide willingness to try new things. An editorial calendar is not only where you keep track of, coordinate, and share your upcoming content, it is a strategic tool that helps your team execute integrated programs that include your content. Keeping an editorial calendar ensures that you’re releasing your content at the best possible moment, and that your whole team is aligned around the release dates. 
If you are an online business or want to have a meaningful online presence, there’s no denying the importance of search engine optimization. When it comes to SEO, content is supreme – the right content, strategically placed or distributed over the internet can lead to immense exposure for your business. Our writing company specializes in creating SEO rich content that can help your website get noticed by the online audience. What’s more, we offer affordable solutions that can fit every budget.

Understanding the purpose of content is key to producing high-quality work. It's meant to speak directly with a particular audience, such as customers, potential customers, investors, employees, or other stakeholders. Content can be well-written, researched and creatively conceived, but if it isn't speaking to the intended audience, it's not doing its job.  Here are a few good examples of long-form, quality content written by Scripted writers:
Check your local college or university for a technical writing certificate program. Look at the faculty of the program to confirm you are being taught by professionals in the field or working content writers who are familiar with the demands of the writing industry. Certificate programs can be beneficial for writers who are new to content writing or technical writing.[6]
The message doesn't many graphics or colors added compared to most HTML emails. As such, the hyperlinked calls-to-action garner even more attention. When readers scan through the text and focus in on things like bolded words, images, and hyperlinked text, reiterating the same offer over and over hammers home for them exactly what you want them to do -- redeem your offer by clicking your call-to-action.
being a content writer at upwork , i have worked 790 hours and written a lot of web content writing. Thanks for sharing the tips my dear friend. i am a synthesizer, harmonica, keyboard and guitar teacher at performing artist society affiliated under srijony bangiya sangeet kala kendra. I also teach anthropology and hospital administration and reiki courses at institute of performing art and mind power development .

Books. Like movies, people often think of books as selling themselves, but savvy marketers don’t sell books just to sell books, they sell books as marketing tools. Michael Port’s sales manual Book Yourself Solid is a great read for entrepreneurs, salespeople, and marketers, and while I’m sure Port enjoys selling his book, the book is a tool for driving customers to his coaching and speaking services. Although with self-publishing it’s easier than ever to publish a book, there is still the perception that it’s difficult and that only reputable professionals can publish a business book. Publish your own, and even if people don’t read it you can still use it as a form of content marketing every time you’re introduced as “Author of…”


Before you even start to write content, you need to know what you’re writing about — and you can kill two birds with one stone if you combine search engine optimization with your editorial calendar planning. New York Times Bestselling author and top marketer Neil Patel calls keyword research “the most important part of digital marketing” and “how we keep our ears to the ground,” and for good reason.
In business, there are few things that can guarantee your success as much as a persuasive sales letter. It can make all the difference between success and failure. Seriously. They do. And if you're among the very small minority in this world of copywriters who can write highly persuasive sales copy, you're likely very rich. It's true. The people who've mastered this area in business are usually the proverbial cream of the crop.

There are many firms that offer content marketing services, often paired with SEO or PR. If you’re simply too busy to do it yourself and aren’t ready to manage it in-house, then hiring a firm may be your best option. But if you want to jump in and do your own content marketing the easiest way is to start blogging. It will likely be hard at first, but the more you do it, the better you’ll get at it. Following tips from websites like Copyblogger you’ll quickly learn how to craft content for your website or blog that will engage readers and turn them into customers or clients. But while technically good writing and the right headlines can help, it’s not the key to creating great content that is the best form of content marketing.
You're Director of Marketing for an agency that specializes in design solutions for small businesses. You're having trouble attracting customers, though, because keeping an agency on retainer seems like a luxury for a small business. So you decide to create some DIY design tools to help them, you know, DIY. You do some keyword research and notice about 2,000 people are searching for an "infographic generator" every month, so you decide to build one that people can use for free once -- and if they like it, they can create more infographics for free if they provide a name and email address.
Don’t forget about your preview text! This is the copy beside the subject line. If you don’t write customized copy, most ISPs will pull the beginning of your email body copy. This is a great chance to provide some explanatory language if you have a subject line that gets creative so that readers will definitely know what’s inside the email once they open it.
Lack of creative license. Though you may think content writing will give you a chance to showcase your creativity and rousing ability with words, in fact, most content writing is seen as a way to sell a product or simply inform a reader of the facts. In a content writer role, you will likely be writing about dry or dull topics, though you may get a chance to also write copy for more engaging projects on occasion. Your employer will dictate the topics you write about, and you will need to learn to be flexible and engaged on even the most obscure or boring subjects, regardless of your personal preference.[4]
John is a copywriting boss. The ideas and education I've received through John and the McMethod, have directly contributed to a 300% monthly revenue increase in my consulting business in the last 12 months. But the expertise runs much deeper than setting up a basic autoresponder: I've learned sharp ways to research the customer psychology, how to think about the macro-level strategy of segmenting buyers, what kind of tone to use for different mediums/buyer profiles, and how to craft kickass cold emails to drum up new business out of thin air. The cool thing about John is: his curiosity is like a vacuum machine sucking in ideas from his own tested marketing, and those of the world's veteran marketers/copywriters on the podcast...and I just get to sit back, listen, and get the concentrated insights of the world's top business players. As a direct response marketer, I can't recommend highly enough.
Lack of creative license. Though you may think content writing will give you a chance to showcase your creativity and rousing ability with words, in fact, most content writing is seen as a way to sell a product or simply inform a reader of the facts. In a content writer role, you will likely be writing about dry or dull topics, though you may get a chance to also write copy for more engaging projects on occasion. Your employer will dictate the topics you write about, and you will need to learn to be flexible and engaged on even the most obscure or boring subjects, regardless of your personal preference.[4]
I hired Chris Orzechowski to write copy for our latest Kickstarter project. The first 5 emails he wrote for us generated over $100,000 of sales in the first three hours of our launch. After 30 days, we made a grand total of $5,170,445 of sales. And as a result, we added 18,550 new buyers to our house list. Chris’s copy is clear, engaging, and fun to read. And most importantly… it will make you a fortune. If you’re looking for a professional copywriter who can transform your business… then hire Chris immediately before your competition does.
To me, the two best copywriters in the world are Frank Kern and Dan Kennedy. These are two individuals that I admire most. Not because of what they've achieved. But, because of this skill that I hold near and dear to my heart. The ability to write compelling and killer sales copy that will sell anything is so vital in business. Some get that. But, most people don't.
There are a host of metrics to look at when you have a robust analytics solution, but having too many goals to live up to tends to result in prioritization difficulties. I recommend content marketing teams have 2-3 metrics they measure, and perhaps some secondary metrics each sub-team can measure to help understand when there are different levers to pull. Here are my recommendations:
I was about to buy a book on copywriting, but wanted to check out some free resources on the internet before doing so. Your blog post Henneke was the first I decided to read. I considered myself lucky and really enjoyed the examples. They really gave me some more inspiration for my own writing. Thanks for sharing. By the way, instead of buying a book I check out more of your articles and I’m confident to find some more golden nuggets 🙂 All the best!
The reliable source of traffic and leads from your evergreen content will give you the flexibility to experiment with other marketing tactics to generate revenue, such as sponsored content, social media advertising, and distributed content. Plus, your content will not only help attract leads -- it will also help educate your target prospects and generate awareness for your brand.
Moreover, using all caps is not a recommended way to engage users, as it’s akin to yelling. Perhaps promotional print content is a fine medium for this style, but web isn’t. If your content is structured in an optimized way, using appropriate and descriptive titles and headings, lists, inverted pyramid style, keywords close to the left hand margin, and concise copy, then there shouldn’t be a need to use caps for emphasis.
The personal finance site Mint.com used content marketing, specifically their personal finance blog MintLife, to build an audience for a product they planned to sell. According to entrepreneur Sachin Rekhi, Mint.com concentrated on building the audience for MintLife "independent of the eventual Mint.com product."[18] Content on the blog included how-to guides on paying for college, saving for a house, and getting out of debt. Other popular content included in-depth interviews and a series of financial disasters called "Trainwreck Tuesdays." The popularity of the site surged as did demand for the product. "Mint grew quickly enough to sell to Intuit for $170 million after three years in business. By 2013, the tool reached 10 million users, many of whom trusted Mint to handle their sensitive banking information because of the blog’s smart, helpful content."[19]
Email copywriting is a mixture of art and science. There is a formula that will position you to succeed, but just following it won’t cut it in today’s noisy email marketing ecosystem. Bring in your own nuanced touch and perspective and appreciate that writing takes time—when you let yourself commit to and dedicate time to improve, you will usually find the words you’ve been looking for in the end.
Web content writing is nearly always done on a “ghostwritten” basis.  That means that you’re producing content that will be published under other peoples’ names.  Since your name won’t usually be attached to the final live version of your work – and since you’ll be expected to edit your “brilliant” work to your client’s specifications – anyone with an ego need not apply.

Lack of creative license. Though you may think content writing will give you a chance to showcase your creativity and rousing ability with words, in fact, most content writing is seen as a way to sell a product or simply inform a reader of the facts. In a content writer role, you will likely be writing about dry or dull topics, though you may get a chance to also write copy for more engaging projects on occasion. Your employer will dictate the topics you write about, and you will need to learn to be flexible and engaged on even the most obscure or boring subjects, regardless of your personal preference.[4]

Really, there’s no right or wrong answer as to which type of writing contract you should pursue.  I’ve worked in every possible combination from part-time freelancing on the side to full-time freelancing to full-time remote work for a single employer.  Most people will find it easiest to start with a few small freelance projects, which will get their feet wet enough to figure out which course of action to pursue.
Kern is a master at striking the conversational tone. He makes himself highly relatable and easy to understand. It's like he's speaking to a friend. And it's as if you've known him forever. His old persona was the lazy surfer. Yet, Kern is the furthest thing from lazy. In fact, he's one of the hardest working marketers out there. So is Dan Kennedy.
Practice article writing. Learn how to write a newspaper article and how to write a wikiHow article. As a professional content writer, you may find a position that focuses on journalistic article style writing, or more educational how to writing. Study the form, structure, voice, and tone of each type of article so you are familiar with both types.

Name recognition is important. Social media puts everything you need within your grasp. Build your audience, meet publishers and talk to industry experts. When your writing is published, the fun has only just begun. The more active you are on social media, the more likely your followers will be to recommend your content. Successful content writers are active, public and friendly.

Problem: I need to reach more customers, while keeping my costs low. According to Forrester research, today’s customers distrust and resent marketing that interrupts or intercepts them. Engaging content marketing should be part of a natural conversation with current and potential customers, be relevant to their interests and behaviors, and build a continuous story over time. Content marketing pays dividends for a very long time, and this effect multiplies as you build out your content library. 

There are a host of metrics to look at when you have a robust analytics solution, but having too many goals to live up to tends to result in prioritization difficulties. I recommend content marketing teams have 2-3 metrics they measure, and perhaps some secondary metrics each sub-team can measure to help understand when there are different levers to pull. Here are my recommendations:

Unlike other forms of online marketing, content marketing relies on anticipating and meeting an existing customer need for information, as opposed to creating demand for a new need. As James O'Brien of Contently wrote on Mashable, "The idea central to content marketing is that a brand must give something valuable to get something valuable in return. Instead of the commercial, be the show. Instead of the banner ad, be the feature story."[3] Content marketing requires continuous delivery of large amounts of content, preferably within a content marketing strategy.[4]
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