Theory #1: The mere act of publishing content on a regular basis does a lot of the "distribution" work for you -- if you consider search engines a distribution channel. (Which I do, considering how often people use them to find content.) If you create content on a regular basis that's informed by keyword research and optimized for search, Google takes care of the rest of your content distribution plan.
On March 6, 2012, Dollar Shave Club launched their online video campaign. In the first 48 hours of their video debuting on YouTube they had over 12,000 people signing up for the service. The video cost just $4500 to make and as of November 2015 has had more than 21 million views. The video was considered as one of the best viral marketing campaigns of 2012 and won "Best Out-of-Nowhere Video Campaign" at the 2012 AdAge Viral Video Awards.
Organize your content so that your website is easy to navigate. Use hyperlinks to articles on your own website and to other helpful sites. Do keyword research to determine what keywords people are likely to use to find your content. Sprinkle your content with those keyword phrases, paying particular attention to your article title, headings and your leading paragraph.  Provide alternate text descriptions for your images (Google loves knowing what images mean).
Traditionally, marketers have had to “rent attention” from other people’s media through display ads on websites, booths at trade shows, or emails sent to third-party lists. For example, when a brand pays out millions of dollars for a Super Bowl ad, they are renting the attention that the TV networks have built. Content marketing, on the other hand, allows marketers to become publishers by building their own audiences and attracting their own attention. By creating and distributing content that buyers find useful, marketers increase their brand awareness and preference by establishing a relationship of trust with consumers as they move through the sales funnel. Additionally, content marketing is considered a less costly strategy than some others. It can have a bit of a slower start while your content library grows and reaches a larger audience.

For instance, blog writers may have to keep the content conversational and relaxed, finance writers will have to be more somber in tone, while writers creating content for a sales page will have to subtly prod the reader to buy or at least consider your product or service. We match the writer to the task, so that the final custom output meets your expectations and adheres to the nature of the writing task perfectly.

You write a blog post about your infographic generator, and included a link to the tool in the post so people can try it for themselves. Let's say the visitor-to-lead conversion rate is the same on this blog post as it was in your PPC campaign -- 2%. That means if 100 people read that blog post in your first month, you'd get two leads from it. But your work is done now. And over time, that one blog post you wrote years ago will continue to generate leads over, and over, and over, every single month. And not just that blog post -- every blog post you write will do the same.


You're Director of Marketing for an agency that specializes in design solutions for small businesses. You're having trouble attracting customers, though, because keeping an agency on retainer seems like a luxury for a small business. So you decide to create some DIY design tools to help them, you know, DIY. You do some keyword research and notice about 2,000 people are searching for an "infographic generator" every month, so you decide to build one that people can use for free once -- and if they like it, they can create more infographics for free if they provide a name and email address.
Kern is a master at striking the conversational tone. He makes himself highly relatable and easy to understand. It's like he's speaking to a friend. And it's as if you've known him forever. His old persona was the lazy surfer. Yet, Kern is the furthest thing from lazy. In fact, he's one of the hardest working marketers out there. So is Dan Kennedy.

John is a copywriting boss. The ideas and education I've received through John and the McMethod, have directly contributed to a 300% monthly revenue increase in my consulting business in the last 12 months. But the expertise runs much deeper than setting up a basic autoresponder: I've learned sharp ways to research the customer psychology, how to think about the macro-level strategy of segmenting buyers, what kind of tone to use for different mediums/buyer profiles, and how to craft kickass cold emails to drum up new business out of thin air. The cool thing about John is: his curiosity is like a vacuum machine sucking in ideas from his own tested marketing, and those of the world's veteran marketers/copywriters on the podcast...and I just get to sit back, listen, and get the concentrated insights of the world's top business players. As a direct response marketer, I can't recommend highly enough.
ContentWriters assigns flat-rate writing assignments based on your areas of expertise. You could be asked to come up with proposed blog ideas or be offered regular writing assignments for a specific client or campaign. An editor reviews the work and an administrator is typically responsible for taking care of the customer service aspects of the project. Depending on your niche, this could translate into a moderate amount of assignments paid out twice a month through PayPal.

Predictably, blog posts are typically written by the bloggers. However, if your team is large enough to have someone dedicated to creating gated assets and premium content -- things like ebooks and tools -- they should also write blog posts to help promote those assets. SEO specialists will also work closely with bloggers, as blog posts are often a company's best opportunity to improve organic search rankings. As such, bloggers should be writing posts that help improve the site's SEO, and drive organic traffic and leads. Their editorial should be informed by keyword research, and optimized for SEO.
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