Imagine this like mining for gold. You need to drill and excavate and blast through a tremendous amount of rock before you can find veins of gold. Once found, you chip away, uncovering more and more. Do this until you have carts full of fine gold you can polish and present to your audience. The more tenacious you are as a researcher, the better you'll get at copywriting.
In business, there are few things that can guarantee your success as much as a persuasive sales letter. It can make all the difference between success and failure. Seriously. They do. And if you're among the very small minority in this world of copywriters who can write highly persuasive sales copy, you're likely very rich. It's true. The people who've mastered this area in business are usually the proverbial cream of the crop.

Infographics. These are generally long, vertical graphics that include statistics, charts, graphs, and other information. If you need some examples, here are 197 infographics on the topic of content marketing curated by Michael Schmitz, head of Content Lab at Publicis, Munich. Infographics can be effective in that if one is good it can be passed around social media and posted on websites for years. You can get a professionally designed infographic by hiring a contractor on a site like oDesk or if you want to remove some of the risk you can go with a company like Visua.ly. A decent infographic will usually cost you at least $1,000 to have designed, but can cost several thousand dollars if you are hiring a contractor or agency to include strategy and planning, research, copywriting, and design. There is also the matter of promoting that infographic to bloggers and the media. Or you could set up a board on Pinterest and curate infographics on a topic related to your business. That is also a form of content marketing, and it costs nothing but your time. Hey, it worked for Michael.
What about official titles and Latin terms, you say? Again, if the purpose of italics is to emphasize text, this is accomplished through the capitalization of principle words, which already distinguishes names and titles from the surrounding text. Italics should be reserved for print products only. Why exclude a portion of your audience from accessing your web content effectively?
I am day 1 brand new to the world of web writing,etc. After reading verbatim all the post from 2013 -2016 I am amazed at how simple you make this sound. I am not sure what to specialize in at this infant stage, but I have one very important question…Can you suggest if and how I should proceed be it buying a course outline about copywriting or are the enough free websites willing to offer their knowledge and experience to beginners like me. Any advise and or guidance is gratefully appreciated, thank you!
Aaaaah! What a joy to read these words. Thanks Henneke. I never cease to be delighted at the power of words and what they can conjure up. My particular favourite wordsmiths are the guys at Ground Effect in New Zealand. I get the catalogue just for the copy – although they do have wicked cycling gear at the right price. ….. Here’s how they describe one of their jackets and a summer weight top.
Reorganize: This isn’t just an efficient way to pump out new content—it’s also a smart way to reach members of your audience who like to consume content in different ways. Some people you’re marketing to may like ebooks, while others prefer infographics, and still others learn best from slide decks. Slicing and dicing allows you to reach more people with less effort.
Moreover, using all caps is not a recommended way to engage users, as it’s akin to yelling. Perhaps promotional print content is a fine medium for this style, but web isn’t. If your content is structured in an optimized way, using appropriate and descriptive titles and headings, lists, inverted pyramid style, keywords close to the left hand margin, and concise copy, then there shouldn’t be a need to use caps for emphasis.

Great article! Working on a new informational site for a service industry my husband and i are starting locally. This has been the best advice i have yet to read – as a blogger and a content junkie myself – it is difficult to write for other people because i do read every word – however one of my employees writes his own estimates and emails to customers – and drives me insane with his “wordiness” I’m always taking out words – and years ago i learned in business law that you could read every 3 words in a contract to get thru it quickly- and have the jest of it – (then go back and reread later
It's important to do regular reporting -- I recommend monthly -- on each of these metrics so you know where your growth levers lie. Regular reporting also helps you identify negative trends or plateaus early-on so you can address them before they become bigger issues. Most importantly, however, tracking the success of your initiatives makes it easy for you to repeat what works, eliminate what doesn't, and promote the success of your content marketing program so you can justify its expansion, and its seat at the modern marketing table.
"Ideation" is a marketing industry buzzword that describes the creative process of finding a subject, title and angle to write about; and ideation begins with analytics. Most ideation is done in a team setting, but freelance writers are usually on their own. Which is why it's helpful to know how professional marketing teams generate ideas. Before doing that, successful content writers need to: 
Lack of creative license. Though you may think content writing will give you a chance to showcase your creativity and rousing ability with words, in fact, most content writing is seen as a way to sell a product or simply inform a reader of the facts. In a content writer role, you will likely be writing about dry or dull topics, though you may get a chance to also write copy for more engaging projects on occasion. Your employer will dictate the topics you write about, and you will need to learn to be flexible and engaged on even the most obscure or boring subjects, regardless of your personal preference.[4]
I am a university student and currently taking writing composition class. My assignment is to do research to develop my own top ten list of effective WEb writing principles, so can you please assist me in my research. Our teacher asks us to find three web sites that exemplified the principles of effective writing for the web. I am new to this web writing principles, it is like a blog analysis. I also need a short presentation on the exemplary sites and explain why I selected these examples. Can you get back to me to my email, please. I do appreciate your huge help.
Step 4: Produce and optimize your content. If you’re starting with original, high-quality content that you’ve invested real time and money to create, you’ll want to get the most out of every asset. You’ll also want to be sure your content stays fresh—out-of-date, no longer relevant content hurts your brand’s credibility. To make sure you’re getting the most out of your content marketing, remember the three Rs: 
With the pace of social media and the frequency of blogging, not to mention that many of your content assets will be used across multiple campaigns and teams, a lightweight project management tool is critical. I recommend using a free software called Trello, which helps you organize your content, set deadlines, attach files, and collaborate with multiple teammates. Another great tool for keeping content projects organized from planning to publishing is Zerys -- a content marketing tool with a built-in marketplace of professional writers. 
97% of consumers surveyed by @Pardot said bad #content negatively has impacted their trust in brands. #marketing Click To TweetMost businesses understand that they need to up their content game — that’s why our last post about web content writing tips was one of the most popular we’ve ever written. But just wanting to do better won’t make you a great website content writer, and the differences between strong and weak content marketers can make a significant difference in brand perception, web traffic and conversions.
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